Thursday, February 11, 2010

Oskar Klausenstock's amazing Holocaust™ fairytale

Klausenstock's tale reads like a Hollywood script.

Oskar survived many close calls. Every four or five days, he had an experience where he thought he was going to die, but he miraculously survived.

The closest was when a Nazi soldier was counting off every 10th Jew to kill, and he was mistakenly counted as No. 10, but the Nazi guard caught the mistake, and Oskar was actually only number 9.

Another time he escaped and travelled hundreds of miles eastward through the Polish forests, crossed a heavily guarded river, and was rescued by Soviet soldiers.

He was once strafed by British Spitfire planes along with other laborers at an airfield.

Another time he escaped from the Germans by hiding in a hay bale.

Then another time he snuck into a group of American POWs being marched to a camp, falling behind the last guy in the line. When he tapped the man on the shoulder, he responded 'Holy sh--!,' The Americans gave him a coat to blend in.

After the war was over, Klausenstock served as an interpreter for the occupying U.S. Army, he even spent some time working for Gen. George Patton.

Klausenstock was the only one of 38 family members to survive the Holocaust.

Oskar Klausenstock served as a doctor in the U.S. Army from 1955-57.

Tiburon man recounts escapes during Holocaust

Marin Independent Journal
Brent Ainsworth
Posted: 01/26/2010

Wednesday is International Holocaust Memorial Day, which marks the 65th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz death camp.

Dr. Oskar Klausenstock of Tiburon never spent time in Auschwitz, but he vividly remembers the names of five camps where he did spend time: Plaszow, Gross-Rosen, Ganacker, Flossenburg and Dachau.

"There were several others," said Klausenstock, 87.

A retired radiologist/oncologist, Klausenstock sits in his comfortable Reed Ranch home and marvels that he survived so many close calls. The closest: when a Nazi soldier was counting off every 10th Jew to kill, and Klausenstock - then in his late teens - was No. 10.

"He counted sieben, acht, neun ... and then for some reason he looked at me and said neun again," Klausenstock said. "And the man next to me had to step out and be No. 10."


Klausenstock was the only one of 38 known family members that survived the war. Two aunts and one uncle escaped to Palestine before the war broke out.

"Dad's an amazing man," said Dan Klausenstock, 48, son of Oskar and Judy Klausenstock, who were married in 1952. "To overcome what he has experienced and still have a positive attitude and be upbeat about humanity at all, it amazes me."

Klausenstock was born in a tiny village in southern Poland. "My shtetl made the one in 'Fiddler on the Roof' look like a metropolis," he said. As a teen he apprenticed to a weaver and a furrier and played goalie for his school soccer team. All that changed on Sept. 1, 1939, when World War II began with the German blitzkrieg.
The area was quickly overrun and the apartment he shared with his mother and stepfather was ransacked. Jews were rounded up and detained.

In the first of his many escapes, Klausenstock received a break from an old soccer friend who had been recruited to work for the Germans. A planted note from the friend told him to scale a wall at midnight, so young Oskar did just that, slicing his hands on the glass shards protruding from the top. He fled with a younger cousin hundreds of miles eastward through the Polish forests, forded a heavily guarded river and was welcomed by Soviet soldiers.

He assumed the life of a Ukrainian farm boy but was overrun again by the Nazi forces. His first concentration camp was Plaszow, made famous by "Schindler's List" - a film Klausenstock is forbidden to see by order of his wife. He was often transferred to other camps and worked in quarries, as a blacksmith and as a welder.

At Flossenburg, he was detained along with the son of Soviet premier Jozef Stalin. He narrowly missed being assigned to an unexploded bomb detonation detail in which many Jews were killed.

He was once strafed by British Spitfire planes along with other laborers at an airfield where the Nazis were testing the first jet plane, the Messerschmidt Me-262.

"Somehow my luck followed me the entire war, and I don't know why," Klausenstock said. "Every four or five days, I had an experience where I thought I was going to die."


In May 1945, he was being marched outside of a camp with a group that had started as 800 emaciated and exhausted prisoners. Anyone who stumbled and fell was shot. The group, down to about 45 survivors, was stopped for a rest at a barn. Klausenstock hid in a hay bale and was stunned that no German soldiers checked the bales with a pitchfork.

When he came out the next day, he saw in the distance American POWs being marched under guard toward a camp. He sneaked behind the group while wearing his prison camp striped pajamas and tapped the shoulder of the last man in line.

"He said two words I'll never forget: 'Holy sh--,'" said Klausenstock, who knew enough English to understand.


He was given a coat to blend in with the marchers. Arriving at the camp, the prisoners cleaned up their new mascot by soaping him up in a pigs' trough. "That was my baptism," Klausenstock said.

A few days later, an Allied victory was declared. Within weeks, Klausenstock was serving as an interpreter for the occupying U.S. Army, and that fall he spent some time working for Gen. George Patton just before the general died from injuries in a traffic accident.

When the Allies were staking European claims in the months after the war, the Soviets had eyes for the famed Lipizzaner Stallions, which had been moved from Vienna to Simbach, Germany. As far as the Soviets were concerned, the show horses were property of the Hungarian military and thus could be turned into cavalry horses. Klausenstock orchestrated a transfer of the horses into American hands and later learned to ride the stallions himself.

Klausenstock studied medicine in Frankfurt, Germany, before coming to the United States in 1949 with the aid of U.S. Army contacts. He had $1.90 to his name when he was accepted at Boston University.

He laughs as he recounts the three years he worked as a doctor at Fort Huachuca in Arizona. "Imagine me, after what I had been through, a captain in the U.S. Army right next to Tombstone, Ariz.," he said. He finished his studies at Stanford, worked at two hospitals and then opened his practice in San Francisco in 1959.

Klausenstock has soothed himself by writing his memoirs, mostly unpublished, and immersing himself in poetry. He has never attended a Holocaust survivors meeting.

"When it was all over, foremost in my mind was to forget it," Klausenstock said. "Some people have more difficulty than others in doing that. My healing was that I was not a Holocaust survivor, I was a human being. In a way, I have become a stranger to myself, but it is a good estrangement."

source: http://www.marinij.com/tiburonbelvedere/ci_14273825?source=rss

14 comments:

Northerntruthseeker said...

Why does this clown's stories seem to be drawn from Jewly-wood's movie scripts?

Hiding in hale bales? Lets see... How about "The Longest Day"

Getting a coat from an American in line....Gee, how about "The Great Escape"

And I bet all the others also come from Jewly-wood's own fairy tales also!

Wolf, these clowns get more and more preposterous all the time!

Lone Wolf said...

Yeah Northern. I should have said it reads like a compilation of several Hollywood scripts.

FugaziQuo said...

The closest was when a Nazi soldier was counting off every 10th Jew to kill, and he was mistakenly counted as No. 10, but the Nazi guard caught the mistake, and Oskar was actually only number 9.

How fortunate for laughing stock...oops...sorry...Klausenstock that the Nazi guard developed a sudden case of innumeracy just as as Klausenstock was about to depart for the great synagogue in the sky.

Another time he escaped and travelled hundreds of miles eastward through the Polish forests, crossed a heavily guarded river, and was rescued by Soviet soldiers.

Are we to assume that clowns-in-stock...oops...sorry...Klausenstock made this incredible journey without food, water or protective clothing? And are we also to assume that our intrepid hero learned how to become invisible along the way? Maybe the Russian guards all somehow experienced a communal and simultaneous bout of temporary blindness, or perhaps they were all pissed out of their skulls on strong vodka and were fast asleep at the time Klausenstock swam past them unnoticed.

Klausenstock was the only one of 38 family members to survive the Holocaust.

There's always one jammy bastard that escapes, isn't there?

He was once strafed by British Spitfire planes along with other laborers at an airfield where the Nazis were testing the first jet plane, the Messerschmidt Me-262.

In 1945, British pilots were able to bomb fifteen square miles of Dresden into oblivion yet they cannot hit a moving target with machine-gun fire. How incompetent and inconsistent is that?

Every four or five days, I had an experience where I thought I was going to die.

I'll bet that there a lot of Palestinians who have the very same experience every fucking day.

Klausenstock hid in a hay bale and was stunned that no German soldiers checked the bales with a pitchfork.

And I'm stunned that not one of the soldiers thought of setting the bale ablaze.

When he came out the next day, he saw in the distance American POWs being marched under guard toward a camp. He sneaked behind the group while wearing his prison camp striped pajamas and tapped the shoulder of the last man in line.

He said two words I'll never forget: 'Holy sh--,'" said Klausenstock, who knew enough English to understand.

There are two English words I can utter that Klausenstock will definitely understand: "complete" and "bullshit".

Within weeks, Klausenstock was serving as an interpreter for the occupying U.S. Army, and that fall he spent some time working for Gen. George Patton just before the general died from injuries in a traffic accident.

General George Patton was evidently not blessed with the same amount of good fortune as 'holocaust survivor' Oskar 'Lucky' Klausenstock was. Oskar deserves an Oscar for a quite superb acting performance.

Lone Wolf said...

There's always one jammy bastard that escapes, isn't there?

Hehehe

And have you noticed how many Holyhoax survivors claim they were the "only one" of their family of 50/60/80 people to survive?

Must be another one of those magical miracles of the Holocaust™ that so many survivors were the "only member of their family to survive."

Greg Bacon said...

that fall he spent some time working for Gen. George Patton just before the general died from injuries in a traffic accident.

Traffic accident or assassination? Patton didn't have any soft spot for the Jews, slapping one in a field hospital and calling him a "yellow belly coward."

I went googling to find that exact quote from Patton. I entered this search phrase "Patton called a Jew soldier a yellow belly coward" and found this link waiting:

Offensive Search Results
We're disturbed about these results
as well. Please read our note here.


http://www.google.com/explanation.html

I'm disturbed that Google is disturbed. Not.

Crush The Talmudic Zionist Serpent said...

Every five days I nearly died,
To re-inforce my story I lied and lied,
Almost was shot by a Spitfire plane,
The crocodile tears flow again and again,
Stood in line waiting for death,
But No 10 never signalled my last breath,
Two Aunts and and Uncle escaped to Palestine,
They have bled the German nation for all this time,
Out of 38 I was the only who survived,
All the rest were shot or fried,
I was placed in five different camps,
An evil Commandant selected people on the ramps,
I escaped through forests for hundreds of miles,
I spout so much shit I've got massive piles,
Later on I hid in a barn,
For the sake of my people I must continue this yarn,
All of the above is completely not true,
What did you expect from a lying Talmudic Jew?

Greg Bacon said...

Is the Holocaust Torah rabbi a fraud?
January 25, 2010

He's been written up in The New York Times. The Christian Science Monitor called him the "Indiana Jones of rabbis." For years, Maryland's Rabbi Menachem Youlus has regaled congregations across the country with his dramatic tales of rescuing and restoring Torah scrolls from the ashes of the Holocaust.

Now, a lengthy piece in the Washington Post has stopped just shy of calling Youlus a fraud -- a significant development not only because it punctures the rabbi's mythic image, but because as a Torah scribe, Youlus is supposed to be above reproach.

Here's the most damning section:

In the spring of 2008, Central Synagogue, a prominent temple in Manhattan, dedicated another of Youlus's rescued Torahs. This one came with an iconic name attached. Youlus says he secretly unearthed it in Oswiecim -- the Polish town made infamous by its German name, Auschwitz. Oswiecim Jews, Youlus said, buried this Torah in a metal box in their cemetery to save it from the Nazis. More than six decades later, he told the New York Times, he located the scroll with a metal detector and dug it up. But it was missing four parchment panels. The local Jews removed these panels, he said, before burying the Torah, and later somehow spirited the fragments into the camp. Youlus says he placed an ad in a local newspaper offering to pay for parchment with Hebrew writing on it. Miraculously, a priest -- a former Auschwitz prisoner -- responded the very next day and sold him four panels that proved to be an exact match.....

Asked why no one in Oswiecim knew about his ad hoc archaeological dig, Youlus changes major details of the story he told Central Synagogue and the New York Times. He says the box containing the Torah was not made of metal, though he can't say exactly what the material was. Youlus says he simply took an educated guess as to where it was buried, hired a crew to dig and found it in the ground beyond the old cemetery walls. As for the priest who supplied the missing parchment panels, Youlus didn't find him through a classified ad. He says his great aunt -- friends with an unidentified Polish cardinal -- helped find the priest. What was the priest's name? "I have no idea," Youlus says. According to the Archdiocese of Krakow, the last local priest who survived Auschwitz died years before Youlus says he arrived on the scene in 2004.

In a 3-hour interview, Youlus is unable to provide a single name, date, place, photograph or document to back up the Auschwitz stories or any of the others. He says that until Save a Torah was founded in 2004, he kept no records. He refers all requests for documentation since then to the foundation's president, investment banker Rick Zitelman of Rockville.

But in a late December meeting at The Washington Post, Zitelman, 54, shows no documentation for any of the scrolls, despite requests. Zitelman says the only paperwork he gets from Youlus is an invoice the rabbi himself writes up for each Torah. He says Youlus does not submit any airline tickets or hotel receipts for overseas missions. So where does he think Youlus finds the Torahs? "It's my understanding these Torahs come from various locations, including monasteries, museums, antique shops, private owners and other places like that," he says.


http://blogs.jta.org/telegraph/article/2010/01/25/1010309/is-the-holocaust-torah-rabbi-a-fraud

Another candidate for the Elie Weasel Award for Veracity.

Lone Wolf said...

^^Superb Crush!


Youlus is unable to provide a single name, date, place, photograph or document to back up the Auschwitz stories or any of the others. He says that until Save a Torah was founded in 2004, he kept no records.

Not unlike the Holocaust fairytale itself, of which 99.5%+ of the "evidence" for the story is "eyewitness testimony", and completely lacking documentation or other physical evidence.

Crush The Talmudic Zionist Serpent said...

'Photographs. We don't need no stinking photographs!'

Did anyone see the Defamation documentary the other week on Channel 4 (UK)?

A school party from Israel visited the Mdjanek Concentration Camp and their tour guide took great delight in regaling stories of how the Camp Commandant 'Bloodthirsty Bridgitte' used to ride up and down the lines of workers and whip them. LMFAO!!!

Lone Wolf said...

Greg, thanks for the story on Rabbi Youlus. That's too good to not pass along...I've added a post with full article above.

Lone Wolf said...

Did anyone see the Defamation documentary the other week on Channel 4 (UK)?

No Crush. Heard a lot about it, but haven't seen it yet.

Looks like I need to check it out.

FugaziQuo said...

It's a 'must-see', LW.

Watch the video here.

Lone Wolf said...

^Thanks FugaziQuo

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